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are found in tokyo's water supply, as the u.s. bans the import of some japanese foods. >> right there. right there! >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a monster of the deep. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. we will not surrender. those words, the defiant libyan leader moammar gadhafi, who made his first public appearance in a week. despite the allied-imposed no-fly zone, libyan troops continued their unrelenting attacks against rebel-held cities where conditions are described as desperate. the u.s. military says it is considering all options. explosions were heard in tripoli this morning. and susan mcginnis is in washington with more on this story. good morning, susan. >> hi, good morning, betty. the mission in libya is accomplishing its goal, including grounding gadhafi's air force. but as criticism of the operation grows, along with the cost, the u.s. is looking to hand off control. despite a fourth night of allied air strikes pounding libya, leader
the nation. saying u.s. role in attacking moammar gadhafi forces is limited, but necessary. >> i refuse to wait for the images of slaughter in mass graves before taking action. >> gadhafi is still clinging to power and many question whether the u.s. and its allies are doing enough to push him out. we will talk with tu.s. baee ambassador to the u.n. and john mccain. >>> the snake hunt. the venomous cobra that escaped from the bronx zoo remains on loose this morning creating a media frenzy and inspiring a legion of twitter followers "early" this tuesday morning, march 29th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good tuesday morning. i'm erica hill. >> i'm chris wragge. welcome back to the country. the time zone, the program. >> nice to be back sitting next to you, chris. >>> things were busy while i was away. >>> more on the president speech's last night and that ongoing battle for libya. this morning, rebel forces are macing more resistance from gadhafi militias. a state department diplomat is going to benghazi and meet with rebel leaders for the first time. in the meantime, secretary of st
. >>> the storms may be behind us but now new concerns shine now that the sun is back. there have been a bunch of landslides across the bay area we have been telling you about for days and several homes are falling apart. kiet do shows us one woman's disaster in the south bay. >>> reporter: for home owners in this south san jose neighborhood, it's a disaster unfolding in slow motion. >> it's coming, and it's just going straight down. it be there down at the people's house down below if it keeps going. >> reporter: she has lived here just off almaden road all her life and above the backyard, the soil is slipping and toppling trees on her roof. the back lawn used to be flat but it broke off and sunk fleet. it's all going downhill literally inch by inch. >> what about my land? my land hour moving -- is moving hourly. >> reporter: a large chunk of the hill say the has dragged down power lines, ruptured a natural gas line and eat any way at the roll. the tan colored two-story home belongs to a woman and the ground around it has given way exposing the home's foundation. retaining walls are cracking
@captioncolorado.com >>> good morning. breaking news. a u.s. war plane crashes in libya but the americans are board are said to be safe after a third night of attacks on tripoli and growing diplomatic battles who should take the lead in this mission. we will get the latest from libya and talk with senator john mccain about what is next for the u.s. and its allies. >>> fallout fears. japanese officials say the struggle to control leaking radiation at a crippled nuclear plant could go on for weeks as water in one of the storage pools becomes dangerously hot. concerns continue to grow over radiation leaking into the food and water supply while the death toll continues to skyrocket, "early" this tuesday morning, march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "the early show" here on a tuesday morning. chris wragge along with erica hill. you're seeing pictures of an f-15 eagle strike down over libya late last night. >> breaking news we are following this morning. we want to get you the very late evidentest on that american fighter jet. you can see it crashed and what happened to the two on bors, david
>>> good morning. a responsibility to act. president obama addresses the nation saying u.s. role in attacking moammar gadhafi's forces is limited, but necessary. >> i refuse to wait for the images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action. >> but nearly two weeks in to the mission, gadhafi is still clinging to power and many question whether the u.s. is doing enough to push him out. we'll talk with the president's ambassador to the u.n. and with republican senator john mccain. >>> walmart lawsuit. a massive sex discrimination suit against the retail giant heads to the supreme court today. it could involve more than a million female employees and cost america's biggest employer billions of dollars. >>> and the snake hunt. the venomous cobra remains on the loose creating a media frenzy and inspiring a legion of twitter followers early this tuesday morning march 29th, twitter followers early this tuesday morning march 29th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good tuesday morning. >> good to have you back. welcome back to the country, the time zone. >> nice to be back sitting
. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americans from japan and u.s. officials reminded those staying behind to get out of that 50-mile danger zone around the fukushima dai-ichi plant. the reactors damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami were bombarded today with water mr. from helicopters, police water cannons and fire trucks to try to cool them off and prevent a meltdown, but it's not at all clear if it's working. and in washington, the head of the nuclear regulatory commission said it could take weeks to get these reactors under control. bill whitaker in japan begins our coverage. >> reporter: this new video released today gives the clearest picture yet of the stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. >> what we're seeing is that the damage from the fires is very significant. >> reporter: today, japanese military helicopters with protective led-lined cockpits dumped water on reactor three, attempting to cool the nuclear fuel rods. but much of the water appeared to disperse in the wind. police and firefighters also brought in water cannons to douse the reactor but
cyrus playing lohan in the skit. that is your last call, thanks for joining us tonight. we'lsee you again tomorrow from behind the scenes videos and posts check out our facebook fan page. click the "light" button to sign up g night from iowa. ♪ ♪ >>> hello, america. i'm judge judge judge filling in for glenn this week who is on vacation. tonight on the docket, the price of oil and growing government debt. the bloody protest in the middle east and north america set the price of oil skyrocketing. oil is trading at a half-year high of over $100 a barrel. and consumer saw 33% gallon gas price jump at the pump in the last two weeks. meanwhile, the federal government continues racking up endless debt. today is $14 trillion. by the end of next year, if the president gets his way, it will be over $15.6 trillion. that debt is money. you and your children will have to pay back. our progeny will be born as financial slaves to the federal government, as they will have their way to tax to spend for spending that occurred before they were born. yet the big government shakedown doesn't stop th
used to be considered a criminal because i use medical marijuana as medicine. mr. garcia, i am not a criminal. your refusal to look at me and it blows me away. people who use medical marijuana are not criminals. i live in the worst neighborhood in the world that the former general was talking about. where the medical cannabis clubs are are the safest blocks in this neighborhood. come and check them out. please. >> thank you. you wanted new stuff. but the first speaker had new legislation. >> your time is up, thank you. >> i am an advocate for cannabis patients in the sunset. i just want to say that your request for new information to appeal and to turn this over and reconsider is wrong question to ask us because the information that you used to make your last decision was based on no facts. you used basis faxed to make a decision. we have the truth. if you force us to go to another body beyond your jurisdiction, we will still win this, it will just cost the taxpayers more money and people like you more time. mr. garcia, you need to wake up and don't be so ashamed. >> next speak
residents not to worry about radiation plume expected to reach the u.s. later today. >>> also this morning another major story unfolding. the u.n. backed libya's rebels approving a no-fly zone and clearing the path for military action against moammar gadhafi as early as today. we'll bring you the very latest from both libya and japan, "early" this friday morning, march 18th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good friday morning to you, i'm erica hill. >> i'm chris wragge. good morning to you. following two major stories on the "early" show this morning. >> of course we're looking at japan. but libya, as we mentioned briefly, the u.n. security council voting to approve that no-fly zone. as you can imagine, there are some strong reaction from moammar gadhafi. he's seen in the video there. many saying this really does pave the way for a military action. what could that mean? what could it look like? we'll get you the very latest on that coming up here. >> exactly. but first let's begin with the very latest on the disaster in japan. the danger level is being raised in
-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations full-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations of american citizens. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wonderi
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
. he was just 20 years old. his father, albert, joins us now from york, pennsylvania. mr. snyder, what was your reaction to today's supreme court decision? >> i was kind of shocked. i can't believe that the supreme court today has now told us that we have no rights to bury our dead in peace. it's a sad at a for our military men and women, their families. it's a sad day for all america americans. my first thought is what kind of society have we become? >> couric: are you surprised the decision was so overwhelming with eight out of nine justices backing the protesters? >> yes, i was, katie. they may be book smart but they don't have the common sense god gave a goat. you know, the justices and the government will send their children to war, and they'll send them back in body bags, and then they can't even give us enough respect to pure them in peace. >> couric: the church has protested outside many other funerals. what would you say to other grieving families today? >> well, there's not much we can do about it anymore. when the government won't do anything about it and the courts give us
>> couric: tonight, the u.s. uses a warplane as the allies keep up the assault on libya and qaddafi remains defiant. >> (translated): we win. we will be victorious in this historical battle. we will not surrender. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, they survived one disaster, now these japanese have been forced to take shelter against another threat-- nuclear radiation. america's nuclear problem. where to store permanently more than 145 million pounds of spent fuel rods. and college students struggling to make the grade. what some schools are doing to make sure they graduate. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's four days into a u.s.-led assault on his military, and libya's moammar qaddafi has lost radar installations, tanks, and naval facilities but not his defiance. he appeared in public tonight in tripoli vowing to fight on and telling supporters he will win and will not surrendered. qaddafi's forces kept up their attacks on civilians today in a n
,, >>> breaking news. a u.s. warplane crashes in libya, but the americans on board are said to be safe, this after a third night of attacks on tripoli in growing diplomatic battles on who should take the lead. we'll talk with senator john mccain about what's next for the u.s. and its allies. >>> and fallout fears. japanese officials say the struggle to control leaking radiation at a crippled nuclear plant could go on for weeks as water in a store annual pool becomes dangerously hot. concerns grow while the death toll continues to sky rocket early this tuesday morning march toll continues to sky rocket early this tuesday morning march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "the early show." chris wragge along with erica hill. you're seeing pictures of an f-15-e strike eagle down over libya late last night. >> and that is the breaking news we're following this morning. we want to get you the latest on that american fighter jet. it did crash. what happened to the two on board? david martin joins us from the pentagon with the latest. >> reporter: the headline is tha
>>> show of force. more u.s. warships head to the mediterranean, as libyan rebels consider asking for international military intervention. >>> open for business. the house passes a stopgap budget bill. the senate is expected to follow suit today. >>> and teacher tenure. the next union battle in america >>> and teacher tenure. the next union battle in america begins to take shape. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. this morning, there are reports that libyan government forces have launched air attacks against rebel-held positions in eastern libya. meanwhile, two u.s. navy ships enter the suez canal en route to the mediterranean, and it is also reported rebel leaders are considering whether to ask for outside military help. susan mcginness is in washington with more on this. good morning, susan. >> reporter: hi, good morning, betty. while the opposition leaders in libya are considering asking for western air strikes u.s. defense leaders remain very cautious. they are weighing their options, and the consequences, of u.s.
of the best shows on tv, after all. that's all for us for now. >>> here's my colleague anderson cooper with "ac 360." >> thank you very much, piers. it is 5:00 a.m. in libya right now. moammar gadhafi faced reporters today and spun a story of what he says is happening in libya. it was a story. he says the people love him, his son says everything is peaceful. tonight you will hear their statements and then you will hear the facts of what is happening, you will hear facts and see evidence for yourselves, you will learn the truth from our reporters on the ground and the libyan people themselves trapped in their homes in many cases, speaking out, no longer letting fear rule their lives. new video tonight, fighting taking place, about 130 miles to the east of tripoli where anti-government protesters are in control. listen to the fire. [ gunfire ] >> you can see some of the tracer fire. when aimed at human beings, it is devastating. also, 30 miles west of tripoli, this is the scene. the city contlled by anti-government protesters tonight. but gadhafi's grip on tripoli remains tight. though h
'm erica hill. good to have you with us this morning. we begin with that ongoing pain at the pump, which you have likely noticed. the unrest in the middle east has sent gas prices soaring over the past few weeks. a gallon of gasoline now averages which is 78 cents higher than it was just one year ago. cbs news business and economics correspondent rebecca jarvis joins us from a gas station here in manhattan with more on that price spike and how washington may respond to it. rebecca, good morning. >> good morning, erica. and this is a scene we're really seeing play out across gas stations throughout the country. prices back near $4 a gallon in some places. they even are paying $4 a gallon. back where prices were in 2008. and now the government is considering getting involved. unrest in the middle east has gasoline prices here soaring. in just two weeks prices at the pump have jumped 33 cents. that's the second biggest increase in that amount of time, ever. >> $65 for gas. pretty unbelievable. >> reporter: u.s. drivers are currently paying an average of $3.51 a gallon. with libya's oil fiel
>> couric: tonight, rebels in libya beat back attempts by the army to retake lost territory. the u.s. steps up the pressure on cadmy to quit, but he's still not giving up. i'm katie couric. also tonight, deep trouble in the midwest. heavy rain and melting snow adds up to flooding that's sweeping through hundreds of homes. are teachers taking a lesson from the labor dispute in wisconsin? a union leader is giving some ground on the red-hot issue of tenure. and the american spirit. an artist who brings to life a world his eyes cannot see. from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. moammar qaddafi's latest offensive was a colossal failure and tonight he's more isolated than ever. troops loyal to qaddafi tried to retake three cities overnight but they were repelled by rebel forces. today in one of those cities, zawiyah, there were celebrations in the streets. the people are firmly in charge and demanding qaddafi go. secretary of state hillary clinton warned that unless he does, libya is at risk of a lo
but not u.s. a top qaddafi insider who defected and his connection to pan am flight 103. i'm erica hill. also tonight, milk in the u.s. now showing traces of radiation from japan. what authorities are doing to keep you safe. why did plants that bury nuclear waste inside nevada's yucca mountain get killed? was it safety fears or politics? and the sweet taste of success. they owe their lottery jackpot to a candy bar. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> hill: good evening. katie is off tonight. muammar qaddafi's inner circle continues to shrink. first, his foreign minister defected last night. and then today, his u.n. ambassador quit while in egypt. just the same, qaddafi's military, though decimated by allied air strikes, is still pounding rebel forces. driving them further east away from key oil towns. one rebel leader compared qaddafi to a wounded animal, one that's more dangerous than a healthy one, which once again raises the question-- just what should the u.s. do moving forward? david martin b
make more and get promoted faster. wal-mart is trying their leveled best to keep us out of court so that the facings won't -- facts won't be presented to the public at large. >> reporter: wal-mart says not some the company says that the suit is so big, not all of the women are in the same situation. >> i've had a positive experience at wal-mart like thousands others. not being able to get out of the case is wrong. >> reporter: that's the issue that several will decide, whether hundreds of thousands should be part of the lawsuit. one justice is troubled by a law. he's unsure what was the unlawful policy at wal-mart. outside courts, a plaintiff told about being held for a different standard. >> i was told to blow the cobwebs off of my make up and doll up. >> reporter: if the case goes ahead, it could cost america's largest employer billion of dollars. >>> the u.s. supreme court is expected to rule by summer. >>> an intense search is underway after a shooting in a parking lot of a mall. we're over the marley station's mall parking lot. a man was shot here. he made his way near the high
. >> the u.s. fighter jet goes down. but both airmen escape with minor injuries. joel brown reports for wjz, the u.s. is anxious to hand over control of the coalition attack. >> reporter: all that's left in libya is this burned-out shell. witnesses say the two pilots who ejected were here to control rebels. the pentagon blames equipment failure for the crash. the two pilots aren't badly hurt and are back in u.s. hands. it's the first loss but u.s. officials are calling it a success. >> virtually all are targeted. >> reporter: they launched another 24 missiles at moammar gadhafi's command center today. they extended the no-fly zone over eastern libya. the u.s. is eager to hand over control of the operation. >> a transfer within a few days is likely. >> reporter: it's still not clear just who the u.s. will turn over control to. either britain, france, or nato forces. still, many could say the job is far from done. >> reporter: the loosely controlled group is struggling to hold its ground. -- rebels say more and more civilians are dying inside the city, at the hands of gadhafi's men. >> report
think today will be quiet and thursday and friday mostly quiet. some impulses bringing us a chance of rain here and there. cooler days are ahead after today. high today in the 60s but after that we'll be in the 50s for a couple of days and even cooler. more sunshine toward the latter part of the week. here are the current temperatures around the region. 52 degrees in washington. 50 in ab app list -- annapolis. 47 in martinsberg, west virginia and in fredericksberg it is 59. look for partial sunshine this morning and clouds during the course of the afternoon and tonight. chance of rain late tonight but during the daytime we are dry and highs in the low to mid- 60s. we'll have more shortly and rights now let's go to julie wright and get an update on traffic. >>> a lot going on. unfortunately we have received word of a fatal crash that will tie-up your commute on brandywine road between cedarville road and baden westville road. the big story this morning is the baltimore washington parkway. the accident involving the overturned vehicle northbound before the exit for 95. some traffic i
will lead the operation when the u.s. steps back in the days ahead, though nato is expected to play a major role. meanwhile, a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed today in eastern libya. the two men on board ejected and were rescued. a cbs news poll out tonight finds most americans are following the events in libya closely and nearly seven out of ten approve of the air strikes. mandy clark begins our coverage from the scene of that fighter jet crash. >> reporter: this is all that remains of the american f-15e that went down last night. a steady stream of people came to have a look. saleh saeed saleh, a local farmer, was eager to show us the wreckage. when it it this ground he says it sounded like a rocket exploding. he thought qaddafi's forces were on the attack. officials say the fighter jet crashed because of a mechanical error rather than any enemy fire. it landed east of benghazi which is in the heart of rebel territory. the jet's crew ejected safely. were they okay? were they injured? "the person i saw had minor injuries, just scratches" he says. one of the americans landed in a nearby
senator mike lee will be joining us in a couple of moments. the federal government charges 18 cents a gallon in tax at the pump. nothing to do with getting the oil to you. should we pay that and should the government reduce that tax when oil is spiking 33% in two weeks? >> most of the push i hear, people all wanting to raise the tax we're lucky if we keep the tax where it is, probably what we need to do is have a government friendly to business. we all need electricity. we all need gasoline for our cars. but we have a government right now that i think is the most antibusiness government or administration that we've had in my lifetime >> yet, the president appoints someone like bill daley, the brother of the soon to be exgovernor of chicago and former senior vice president, jp morgan chase to put on the front of being in favor of business. the president went along with keeping the bush era tax rates where they were in the lame duck era of congress. claiming that he is in favor of this. his words don't always match up with what he is doing. >> he claims he wants to do something about
with cbs news correspondent harry smith who joins us on the phone this morning from sendai. harry, you need to stay inside at this point? >> reporter: well, a little bit vague, to be perfectly honest. they prefer we say inside. we were outside all day and plenty of rescue operations and normal citizens going about their business today in sendai. we are several hours north of fukushima where the crippled nuclear reactor is. it looks like the japanese are losing their battle to get control of that place, as we say, fukushima, which is a couple of hours south of where we are, well, there was even more bad news today. fears of a nuclear disaster grew today following a third explosion and fire, the largest so far at the crippled fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. >> translator: the reading of the level seems very high. and there is still a very high risk of further radioactive material. >> reporter: workers were struggling to prevent meltdowns of three reactors at the site when the fourth reactor blew. the fire that followed is believed to be the source of the elevated radiation. some 70,000
's very important to understand what general madis said today. what he said, that is if the u.s. decided to enforce a no-fly zone it would, first, involve u.s. military air strikes against targets inside libya. you'd have to bomb the runways. you might take out their aircraft or certainly their air defense systems, missiles, radar, and the like. so it would involve a u.s. military attack on libya itself. and if the white house makes that decision, of course, the u.s. military would carry it out. but i can tell you that there's a lot of hesitation, not only here in the building and among the u.s. military to take that kind of aggressive step, but even among the nato allies who would be essential if the u.s. and nato allies were to launch any kind of operation like this, and so far only the british are doing any kind of saber rattling in that regard. and the rest of nato nations, allies, are pretty much silent whether to launch any military operation against libya. >> give is insight on the three military war ships in the suez canal. what is their role, at this point? >> reporter: their ro
morning, march 14th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and thanks for joining us on this monday morning. you can see, these are just some of the images which have been coming in, and frankly, they speak for themselves. they're just unimaginable. >> the devastation that we first saw here friday morning, and now, in the days after this disaster in japan, we continue to get more images, more video of exactly the impact that this is having on this nation and the people there. damage estimates in the tens of billions of dollars. but, of course you can't put a dollar figure on the loss of life. and the loss of life as the death toll estimates continue to increase hour by hour in the region. >> they do. and you hear those numbers and you know how well-prepared japan was to deal with something of this magnitude. frightening to think what could have been. the sheer magnitude of this catastrophe is frankly, staggering. the numbers barely begin to tell the story but they do give you a very good idea of where we stand at this hour. the official death toll is currently 2800. one po
nbc's ron allen joins us on the phone from kio. if we can talk abouthis fighter jet that went down. what do we know? >> reporter: what we're being told is the pilots ejected safely. there are conflicting reports about how the pilots were recovered. there's one report that a u.s. helicopter with special forces, or search-and-rescue teams, either one of the two, rescued one, and then there's a report out there the other pilot was picked up by a rebel group, which is interesting and unusual, of course, but that's all we know about the fate of the pilots. they're safe and the pentagon continues to insist this plane was not shot down, that it was a mechanical problem. >> ron allen, reporting from cairo for us, thank you very much. >>> let's talk about what's happening on the ground. for that i want to bring in former general monty miggs. always good to see you. richard engel says these guys, the anti-gadhafi forces can't even load their own weapons, they don't know who their leaders are. it seems like their strategy is to rely on us. how do you see it? >> certainly they have asked for u
follow me on twitter. >>> i'm wolf blitzer. join us week days in the situation room from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. eastern and every saturday 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. eastern here on cnn and at this time every weekend on cnn international. >>> the news continues next on cnn. >>> it is your saturday night and we are tracking severe weather that is making its way across the southeastern u.s. it's already killed one person and injured a dozen in louisiana. >>> a peaceful protest in the ivory coast. one moment a blood bath. just seconds later and you'll see the entire scene as it played out. women gunned down in the streets. the shooters, the government security forces. >>> a new development in the ongoing drama that is charlie sheen. he is taking your questions live. we'll tell you about that. >>> plus the ipad getting competition from blackberry. we're taking apart the playbook and looking at the ipad 2 headed to stores less than a year after its predecessor. i'm don lemon at the cnn world headquarters in atlanta. a lot of news to get to right now. we start in north africa. u.s. military planes are
. at the same time, u.s. and coalition partners kept up the military attacks, launching 22 cruise missile on targets in tripoli. qaddafi's forces, however, are still better armed than the opposition and today they have the rebels on the run. they were forced to retreat just as they prepared to attack qaddafi's hometown of surt. instead, though, they were pushed back more than 25 miles, and not just by the military but by civilians who remain loyal to qaddafi. mandy clark reports tonight from the ever-shifting front line. >> reporter: an attack by qaddafi forces took rebels by surprise at bin jawad. they fought hard with everything they had but were forced back. and even while fleeing came under fire. they had originally retreated to the town because of a new threat rebels here say it wasn't just government forces but also residents firing from their homes that forced them to pull back. they confiscated these weapons handed out by qaddafi forces from locals who were loyal to the regime. how many weapons did you find in total? >> reporter: another problem the anti-qaddafi forces are facing:
. >> reporter: okay, we won't, then. opponents of the regime face great risk in speaking to us but they're getting increasingly desperate. do you think people will continue to-- >> yes. >> reporter: people continue to protest? >> yes. >> reporter: the qaddafi family says it's all outsiders, it's al qaeda, it's people on drugs. what do you say to that? >> you believe this? >> reporter: i'm just telling you what they say. >> you believe? >> reporter: what do you say? >> it's a big lie. it's very big. >> reporter: the battle for zawiyah isn't over. doctors in the town say the death toll has already reached about 60, about half of those civilian from indiscriminate shelling. the government unit in the town is the infamous hamise brigade, named for and led by one of muammar qaddafi's sons, and is about the most feared unit in the libyan army. the rebels say they're bracing for another attack. ruse. >> mitchell: mark, we've seen some libyan army units go over to the rebels. is there any thought that could happen around tripoli as well? >> reporter: well, that is exactly the key. in the east c
with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and today on capitol hill, u.s. energy secretary and nuclear expert steven chu said he, too, is baffled. >> and ther
to a defiant moammar gadhafi as u.s. warships head toward the region. we'll go live for the latest on the deadly violence and speak about what's next. >>> ultimatum. a new cbs news poll find the majority of americans back union workers in the ongoing budget battles as governor walker threatens layoffs if democrats don't come back to work today. we're live in wisconsin. >>> and flood fears. after heavy rains and torptds pound parts of the midwest, floodwaters rise to dangerous levels and the worst is yet to come. early this tuesday morning march come. early this tuesday morning march 1st, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to the "early show" here on a tuesday morning, march 1st. >> nice to have you back. hard to believe it's already march. the year is flying by. go want to get you started with the revolution in libya and the very latest there. the u.s. is trying on increase pressure on moammar gadhafi sending warships and aircraft to the region. meantime billions in libya's foreign assets have now been frozen and overnight rebels held off a prolonged attack by pro gadhafi f
the beginning. >>> the u.s. opened fire on libya. what prompted president obama's decision and how moammar gadhafi is reacting. >> and an ammonia leak prompts a shelter in place order in san jose. >>> it is 7:30 a.m. on sunday, march 20th. spring is just about here but i don't think mother nature got the memo. >> no. no. look outside, ok. spring is here, it's sprung. a lot of news to talk about. we'll look at the weather a lot closer, as well. we have john hademan back from tokyo to talk about the earthquake and its effect on the economy >> he was there when the disaster struck. and in the next half hour, in the 8:00 section, we'll talk about what is going on and what's not going on in sacramento. and how it's going to affect you. >> that's as we approach a deadline for making that special election happen in june. a lot coming up. >>> i think the top story locally is the weather. there is some local flooding out there. the rain has been coming down, and it looks like going to keep on coming for a little while. jim bernard has the latest. we're checking in with you. storm watch, how is it l
>> couric: tonight, as allied forces pound targets in libya, the u.s. military insists qaddafi is not a target, but the commander in chief makes it clear... >> it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebelss solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the oper
and analysis. thanks for inviting us into your home tonight. that's it for "special report," as always fair, balanced informd fair and balanced. an analysis begins right now. >> bill: "the o'reilly factor" is on. tonight: >> we knew that if we waited one more day, benghazi could suffer a massacre that would have have reverberated across the region and stained the con sense of the world. it was not in our national interest to let that happen. >> bill: president obama finally speaks to the nation about libya. did he impress you tonight? brit hume, juan williams and mary katharine ham will have analysis. [shouting] >> bill: libyan woman says she was brutally raped by qaddafi's thugs. we will have the inside story on the who horror this dictator is unleashing. >> wife should leave [bleep] she should walk out on this bamboozle butt dancing tom. >> bill: black panthers say michelle obama should leave the president because is he an uncle tom. hard to believe. caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone, the factor begins right now. ♪ ♪ >> bill: hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching u
to the allegations that in 2003, he lied to a federal grand jury about using steroids. he has had to enter several pleas since prosecutors have rewritten the charges against him several times. bonds says that he has never knowingly taken steroids. trial is now set to begin march 21. >>> also today, bonds' former personal trainer greg anderson told the court he will not testify against the home run champ. the judge told anderson he would be sent back to jail for the duration of the trial if he refuses to take the stand. anderson has already spent more than a year behind bars for refusing to testify against bonds. >>> a surprise substance in a child's cookie has sickened four valve students. investigators say say a fifth grade boy shared two marijuana cookies. he said he received them from an employee from a local convenience store. the clerk said he didn't know they contained pot. >> when you look at the packaging it's not self- evident. you have to read the fine print. >> all four students attend grace patterson elementary school. vallejo police have not finished their investigation yet. >>> frus
>>> good morning. presidential pressure. as moammar gadhafi continues to thumb his nose at the u.s. and its allies, striking back at libyan rebels president obama tells cbs news it is time for gadhafi to give up the fight. >> we've got to ratchet up our diplomatic and our political pressure on him so that at some point he makes a decision to leave. >> we'll hear more from our interview with the president, and speak with former defense secretary donald rumsfeld about the u.s. mission in libya. >>> plane scary. officials discover a bullet hole in a us airways passenger jet after a flight from philadelphia to charlotte. now an investigation is under way to try to figure out just where it came from and how serious a threat it posed to the aircraft and its passengers. >>> and fighting back. a middle school student from connecticut goes on youtube with an emotional plea for help after being bullied by her classmates for years. that video is now burning up the internet, adding to the national debate, causing quite a stir "early" this wednesday morning, march 30th, 2011
>>> good morning. breaking news. the u.s. government gets set to begin evacuating americans from japan, as danger levels remain high at the crippled nuclear plant. this, despite new attempts by military helicopters to cool off the plant's overheated reactors and fuel rods. the top u.s. nuclear regulator says conditions at the plant are much worse than japanese officials say, and recommend that americans stay 50 miles away. and this morning, there are questions about nearly two dozen u.s. nuclear reactors with the very same design "early" this thursday morning, march 17th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. scenes from earlier. military choppers japanese military helicopters, chinooks dropping sea water on this nuclear plant. again, a part of this last-ditch effort to bring sea water in to help cool down these fuel pools, and also the nuclear rods there at this facility. >> that is the effort from the sky. we're also hearing from water cannons on the ground as they try to bring things in th
people. >> the u.s. navy -- the u.s. is moving navy ships closer to libya. the pentagon will not say if any american ground forces have been put on a heightened state of alert. let's get to the u.s. response to this crisis. pentagon correspondent chris lawrence joins us from washington. chris, the pentagon is repositioning army/navy ships to prepare for safe zones for libyan refugee you but is there more to it than that. >> reporter: at this point, no. there could be in the next few days or weeks. right now, the state department has already sent some response teams to both egypt, tunisia. there is an option on the table to consider using the u.s. military to sort of set up a corridor to help handle some of the refugees that have been and may continue to stream out of libya. one of the ships that is now at the northern part of the red sea, right near the suez canal is the "uss kearsarge." it can land marines on the ground but one of the u.s. navy's largest floating hospital bays. it has an intensive care unit and six operating rooms and it can handle up to 600 patients. so it could be
us from tokyo with latest on the nuclear radiation threat. harry, hello. >> yeah, good morning, erica. well, fear, apprehension, anxiety, it has been another emotional day here in japan, as this country waits for just one piece of good news. wednesday morning dawned with yet another fire in the explosion-plagued number four reactor at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. the fire was out in short order. but then, white smoke was seen rising from reactor number three. the 50 nuclear workers who are fighting to keep the cores from melting were said to have evacuated. it was then reported they were only sent to a safer part of the structure. leaving everyone to wonder, what's really going on in there? there is both positive and negative news. i don't know what to believe, she says. is the facility on the verge of a meltdown or not? nearby residents wish they knew more. including, american mark carney. >> i can read articles about, you know, will the radiation reach the united states, and what should you do in california, as i'm sitting in the prefecture in which this is going on, a
, but despite eight days of bombing the u.s. says military ground forces loyal to president gadhafi still pose a significant threat. on monday, president obama will address the nation on the libyan crisis. >>> disaster in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in
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